Dirty Geometry
In Latin American Art

May 3 – September 25, 2015

 

Curated by artist Osvaldo Romberg, Dirty Geometry showcases work that demonstrates what he sees as a rebellious attempt to separate itself from the tight, rigid theoretical framework perpetuated by traditional notions of geometry.

 
 

The exhibition features twenty-three participants, all Latin Americans working in geometric abstraction between 1950 and today, who explore a kind of creolization of orthodox geometric style. They effectively reinvent geometry into a notion that is free from theory—a “dirty war,” according to Romberg. Like the controversial French philosopher Georges Bataille, who believed that “divine filth” leads to pure ecstasy, Romberg believes it is possible to bring about an eroticism of geometry through dirt.

Romberg’s Dirty Geometry subverts the strict, systematic, straightforward qualities of geometric forms pioneered by Wassily Kandinsky, the Russian artist and art theorist credited for creating the first purely abstract paintings. While a number of artists, including Mark Rothko and Frank Stella, have experimented with this bold approach, Romberg feels Latin American artists offer some of the most prominent examples of it.

By twisting and reinventing classic shapes using contemporary cultural prisms, the organic, pared-down works in the exhibition question the role of art in the human experience. Playful, colorful, and subtly sexy, the featured practitioners display a solid consciousness of artistic-cultural identity together with a sense of new possibilities.

 

 

 

 

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IMAGES
Horacio Zabala, Hipótesis XXV, 2010
Cecilia Biagini, Parallel Worlds, 2013
Eduardo Costa, Black and White transversal soft painting, 2007-2008
Luis Roldán, La Pared, 2013
Raul Lozza Untitled N. 706 1963