Pop Culture: Selections From
The Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation


September 29 – December 28, 2013

In conjunction with the Eileen S. Kaminsky Family Foundation (ESKFF), Pop Culture: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation explores the roots of the Pop Art movement in the 1950s and ’60s and its continuing influence today.


Included in the show curated by the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation are iconic works including all ten of Andy Warhol’s variously hued Marilyn Monroe silkscreens, as well as important works by Keith Haring, Jenny Holzer, Roy Lichtenstein, Yayoi Kusama, Edward Ruscha, and others.

When the Pop Art movement first began in the mid-1950s, artists sought to challenge traditional conceptions of art making by incorporating aspects of consumer culture and everyday objects into their work. Artists during this period transformed those icons associated with mass media, comic books, and popular culture into visuals that often reflected a growing societal infatuation with consumerism. When it originated, the Pop Art movement strove to ironically emphasize images representing the kitschy or clichéd elements of a given culture. Today, contemporary artists have elaborated on the traditions established by the Pop artists who created an aesthetic that reflected the changing needs and interests of varying societies.

This exhibition is curated by Billie Milam Weisman, Director, Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation.


Press Release

Nam June Paik, Michelin Man Laser Robot, 1996.
Edward Ruscha, Malibu = Sliding Glass Doors, 1976.
Gilbert and George, Outspan Lick, 1982.
Arman, Football Shoes, 1971.
Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe, 1967.
Keith Haring, Untitled, 1983.
José Luis Quiñones, Crushed Orange, 1980.
Ed Ruscha, End, 1983.
James Rosenquist, Bacon, 1980.


You must select a collection to display.